Guest Bedroom Update

This has been the SLOWEST DIY yet. Mainly because there’s no rush for this space. We’ve had a whopping total of 3 people stay over our house (in the 3 years we’ve been here) and they didn’t even stay in this room because I didn’t have queen sized sheets for this bed. ANYWAY. Here we are, like 400 days later, and I have sheets and a few days off from work. So we’re digging deep and making progress. In total this make over cost less than $200!

Here’s the room before:

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In case you missed it, 100% of our house was this color when we moved in. It’s like a putrid off white egg-shell. The camera and some natural light gave these walls the undeserved benefit of the doubt. First things first. PAINT. Holy Lord does some good Behr  paint go a long way. Pair that with a new hear board and we’re making some awesome progress. This paint color is Wheat Bread by Behr.

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Obviously I took this picture at the wrong time of day, but you can believe me when I tell you how much better it looks already. Also, that lampshade is a work in progress (one day it’ll be its own DIY, but that day is not today).

If you’re like me and you’re on a budget (which by the way is the #1 reason to DIY), you should accept all decor (and furniture) donations from family and friends. In ANY form. My awesome sister-in-law (Hi, Christina) bought two mirrors and they were both delivered damaged. She popped out the mirrors and gave me the frames. I’ve seen a ton of decor blogs that have gutless-frames spotlighting some beautiful and rustic farmhouse pieces. But I can’t bring myself to buy a brand new frame and toss the essence. So this was the perfect opportunity to try something new!

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The two antique keys (lets call it that because they’re super old) that I hung in the frame are from my great uncle’s house. They’re actually not as heavy as they look. They feel like they’re made of plastic, but they’re much more dense than the plastic we have today.

I did the same exact thing on the right sight of the bed. But I didn’t measure correctly *TEARS*. So I filled it with spackle, waited for it to dry, sanded the excess spackle off, and repainted. I always keep the excess gallons of paint after I paint a room, specifically for reasons like this! I keep the paint stacked in a corner in the basement. It doesn’t take up much room at all! By the way, take a look at that paint color!

Here’s the almost final result! I’m going to create a custom sign to fill the space over the headboard.

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In total, this update cost:

  • $60 for the headboard
  • $30 for paint
  • $100 for bedding

Outdoor Couch Cushion

We try and do everything on a budget. We’re on a mission to redo this house with the tears of Abe Lincon. EVERY penny counts. Truth be told, our old neighbors in our apartment complex were throwing these couches away and Brian snagged them at the last second.

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Before

They are awesome. So awesome in fact, a brand new set retails for over $2,000. These cushions have seen better days. They started to smell like moldy fabric death and tear at the corners. I looked up the manufacturer to order replacement cushions and they were RIDICULOUS. Like $300 per cushion. We could have ordered a new love seat for what we would have paid for just the essence of the chair (any Friends fans out there?! “That’s right, I’m taking the essence!”) I tried finding replacement cushions from literally every single english speaking company that has a website. This couch is such a awkward length we had only one more option: DIY.

Here’s the alternative we came up with for about $80 (and an additional $80 for the top pillows I got from Target). Even at $160 all in, that was still a better option than the replacement cushions.

How all good DIY stories start out, once upon a Saturday we went to Home Depot. We got a large piece of plywood for $20. As always, because Home Depot is the best, they cut the wood to size for us (we measured before so we knew the dimensions).

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Then we went to Joanne Fabric and picked out some outdoor fabric for $11. If you subscribe to their text messages they’ll send you coupons. I had a 60% off fabric coupon. I go to Joanne Fabric maybe once a year, but their frequent text messages are totally worth it when you make an awesome score like this.

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Here’s the outdoor fabric we chose

ALWAYS do your research when getting materials for projects. We needed memory foam to complete this project and Joanne’s was selling 2 inch memory foam for $79. We found a larger 3 inch memory foam piece on Amazon for $50. So we opted to wait for the two day delivery to save $29 and get a better piece of padding. We’re so glad we did!

Here’s how it’s done:

Take the cushions and line them up on the plywood. With a pen or pencil, outline the cushions.

With a jigsaw, follow the outline you made cutting away the excess wood.

Don’t go crazy cutting. It’s better to go slow, see what fits and make adjustments. We shaped up the plywood multiple times to make sure that it fit exactly into the frame of the couch.

When you’re happy with the shape of the plywood, place it on top of the memory foam. Use a utility knife to cut along the shape of the plywood, using it as a template.

When you’re finished cutting out the memory foam, take the fabric and place it upside down on a flat surface. Then place the memory foam on the fabric and the plywood on top of the memory foam.

Using a stapler, pull the excess fabric up and staple it to the plywood. Work your way around the plywood stapling the fabric into place. Be sure to pull tightly in the corners and staple generously to keep the fabric in place.

Here’s the final product being enjoyed by The Royals! The blue pillows are from Target. I got all three of them for 15% off for a total of $80. Making the entire project total $180. I think it was pretty worth it!

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Duke is looking ROYALLY comfortable!
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Finished product!

Mid-Century Side Table Up-Cycle

This sweet little side table came to us while we were cleaning out my great uncle’s house. When I first saw it, I knew it wanted a much needed new life with us at the Halle House. Its charm was covered in an inch of dust and old magazines, but I saw right threw it and knew it was coming home. Brian was much less enthused, but as my Design Assistant he carried it out to the car 🙂

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My other design assistant

As you can tell, there was some stuff, I really don’t know what it was, that crusted on there over the years. It was a great little piece with a ton of character, but desperately needed some love. I was between painting and staining it. So I polled my followers on Instagram and my friends on Facebook and the response was completely split down the middle. Minus my brother (Hi, JD) who suggested that I use it for fire wood. *sigh*

Since the response was a tie, I thought. Why not both?  So this was my very first paint and stain mash up and I’m so happy with the results!

Here’s how I did it!

What you’ll need:

  • Stain (color of your choice)
  • Chalk Paint (color of your choice)
  • Sander
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That’s me! I’m obviously excited about my brand new sander my parents got me for my birthday!

That sander made this project infinitely easier! No joke. I sanded the entire table in about 12 mins flat! img_3991

Here it is in action!

After I sanded it down with a 80 and 120 grade sand paper, it was ready to be stained! I took a piece of old dish towel to apply the stain color. I keep old dish towels on hand and cut them into useable pieces for all my projects!

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I actually really liked the way the two different stains looked. In the future I’m going to find a project to incorporate this idea! …One day.

I gave the stain two hours dry time on our back patio since it was beautiful outside. I was so surprised with how quickly it dried. I didn’t think I would be able to get a primary coat of paint on before wrapping up for the day, but I did! I had to bring it inside to dry though. Here’s the first coat of white paint.

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I was able to put another light coat of paint on the day after and it looks spectacular! I didn’t want the paint to look perfectly even. I like the imperfection of uneven brush strokes. It makes the piece look older and gives it another layer of depth.

Here it is styled in our foyer. It looks so fresh and happy!

 

 

Coffee Table Up-Cycle

Shabby Chic is so easy to have in your own home! This was my very first furniture flip!

Here’s what the coffee table looked like when I found it.

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What you’ll need:

  • A Sander (or a drill with a sander attachment)
  • Sander sponge (for distressing, if desired)
  • Chalk paint
  • Paint Brushes
  • Fabric pattern of your choosing
  • Mod Podge Glue
  • box cutter or scissors
  • Finishing wax

First you’ll need to sand off the finish, exposing the raw wood. If you’re having a difficult time doing this, there are finish removers that you can pick up from Home Depot for relatively cheap.

With a damp paper towel remove any lingering dust. Make sure the table is clean so the chalk paint goes on smoothly.

Once the surface is clean, you’re ready to paint! I used 3 coats of paint and let each layer dry about 45 mins between coats.

Chalk paint can be really expensive. Check out a home-made recipe here.

I let the final coat of paint rest overnight. When it’s completely dry, use the sander sponge to distress as desired.

Take the fabric and stretch it over the area you would like to cover. It helps to tape it down so you can get an accurate measurement of the area you will need. You can outline the area you want to cut or use a box cutter right on the spot.

Put down a thick layer of Mod Podge over the area the fabric will be placed. You’ll need to work quickly, this dries fast! Place the fabric over the layer of Mod Podge. Be sure to pull the fabric tight and push out any wrinkles. Once you’re satisfied with the way its positioned, add two more layers of Mod Podge on top of the fabric to seal it in.

After the fabric is set and completely dried, go back and apply a generous coat of wax on the wood to protect it against stains and promote durability.